Calvary The Early Years – History

Announcement  Taken From  Calvary’s
May 14, 1950 – Mother’s Day Bulletin

Our Annual Conference, at its meeting last November in Sanford, requested that all churches in the North Carolina Conference take a collection on Mother’s Day to help develop the property out near Duke University Campus, which was recently purchased by the Methodist Laymen in Durham, for a retirement home for Methodist preachers.  The Conference hopes to raise one hundred thousand dollars so that they may lay out streets and put in sewerage.  All the loose offering at both our services today will be directed to this worthy project.

Note:  It was 1955 when 13 senior adults moved into the Methodist Retirement Home on Erwin Road.
Today (October 2014), the Methodist Retirement Home in Durham is known as Croasdaile Village, where several of our church members reside and where our former pastor, Laurie Hays Coffman, serves as the chaplain.

Follows Simple Principles Laid Down by Wesley – History

Rev. Daniel Lane is Successful Pastor of North Durham Congregation
August 13, 1938 

Unpretentious, unassuming, as the church founded by John Wesley should always be, Calvary Methodist church serves the people of the northern section of the city who are content to worship simply and to work earnestly for the coming of the kingdom.

Typical of the church and its congregation and of the work done at Calvary was the beloved B. C. Woodall, whose death a few weeks ago brought a great loss to the community and as even greater loss to the church, in which he was a pillar of strength. At meetings of the North Carolina Methodist conference, Mr. Woodall represented Calvary church for a number of years, and through him the other Methodists of the state were given a clear picture of what the church in North Durham stands for.
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Organ Installation Program At Calvary Church – History

as reported in the Durham Sun on Saturday, July 29, 1939 

The new Moller pipe organ, which has been recently installed at the Calvary Methodist church, will be used for the first time at tomorrow’s service. mrs. G. W. Gilliam will be the new organist.

The new instrument will be known as the B. C. Woodall memorial organ, in memory of the late Mr. Woodall, who for many years was an outstanding member of the local church.

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The Beginnings of the Choir – 1917

CALVARY UMC – EARLY BEGINNINGS

Taken from Notes written by Mrs. W. A. Beasley

The appointed pastor was Rev. J. H. Frizelle. He organized a choir and bought our fir anthem books. The members of the choir at that time: Mrs. W. J. Woods, Mrs. Will Mangum, Miss Mamie Crim, Mrs. W. A. Beasley, Mres. O. F. Harris, Maude Maynor, Julia Woodall, Madeline Carrington, Nona Mae Mangum, Viola and Margaret Cameron, Althea Veasey, Mable and Made Malone, R. C. Yates, T. E. Carrington, Oscar Maynor. The choir voted to pay dues, 10 cents a month, to buy music.

“The choir does not pay dues any more, since the Board of Stewards are paying for our music. We have now, just one year ago gotten our vestments, which we feel have added to the looks of the choir members.”

A Chronicle of the Calvary Drive for $8,000

Written by Mrs. Sally Duhling

And it came to pass in the time of one Edward Earnhardt, rule of the synagogue, that he became troubled and of sad countenance. So he called twelve of his chosen men together: chief counselors of the synagogue, the chief scribe, and even Cortez of the House of Maynor.

And he spoke unto them saying, “O most noble executors, have we not seen how our neighbors, the Grace Baptists, have prospered and have long since freed their temple from debt? Yea, inasmuch as to raise their ruler’s salary! Wile we, a chosen people, still worship from sabbath to sabbath in an undedicated temple because of heavy debt!

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Brief Beginning History

The Reverend Costen J. Harrell was appointed to Mangum Street Methodist Episcopal Church South in November of 1913. Under his pastorate, plans were made and carried out for the construction of a new church. Calvary was the name chosen by the Reverend Mr. Harrell. The first worship service on the first Sunday in December of 1916 was a sunrise service of Holy Communion. The choir and the minister entered the sanctuary just as the first light of the sun broke through the windows on the east.

The Building Committee was:
B. Cameron
F. Harris
J. Woods
John H. Suggs

The location for the new building was at the corner of Trinity Avenue and Elizabeth Street.

 

Beginnings – A Mission Church

A GLIMPSE OF CALVARY

Researched & Compiled by:
Ruth S. Yarbrough Early

Beginnings – A Mission Church
1880’s to 1902

The History of Calvary dates by to the 1880’s when E. A. Whitaker, an enterprising music dealer and a devoted churchman, opened a small Sunday school mission in the 800 block of North Mangum Street.

Calvary Methodist Church’s history begins in the 1880’s during the growth period of Durham’s tobacco industry, when E. A. Whitaker, music dealer and Methodist layman, opened a Sunday School mission on the second floor of a store building situated in the 800 block of North Mangum Street.  Playing his portable organ and leading the singing, Mr. Whitaker provided the leadership for the afternoon Sunday School sessions until he moved from Durham.  Laymen like Peter Briggs, E. J. Parrish and James H. Southgate continued the mission until almost 1890, when the Reverend Mr. Reuben Hibberd and his wife assumed leadership and provided regular church services as well as Sunday School.  Primarily through the efforts of the Hibberds and the generosity of B. N. Duke, a chapel was build near the intersection of Cleveland and North Mangum Streets, and was named Mangum Street Methodist Episcopal Church South upon its admission to the North Carolina Conference in 1902. While still a mission with eight members the minister on record was the Rev. C. M. Lance, who was succeeded by the Rev. E. M. Hoyle, first minister appointed for four years.  Mr. Hoyles’s dynamic leadership spurred rapid growth from a membership of eight to eighty-one.  The small church building also doubled in size.  A roll of 100 was reached in 1909.

Calvary Methodist Church’s history begins in the 1880’s during the growth period of Durham’s tobacco industry, when E. A. Witaker, music dealer and Methodist layman, opened a Sunday School mission on the second floor of a store building situated in the 800 block of North Mangum Street.  Playing his portable organ and leading the singing, Mr. Whitaker provided the leadership for the afternoon Sunday School sessions until he moved from Durham.  Laymen like Peter Briggs, E. J. Parrish and James H. Southgate continued the mission until almost 1890, when the Reverend Mr. Reuben Hibberd and his wife assumed leadership and provided regular church services as well as Sunday School. Primarily through the efforts of the Hibberds and the generosity of B. N. Duke, a chapel was built near the intersection of Cleveland and North Mangum Streets, and was named Mangum Street Methodist Episcopal Church South upon its admission to the North Carolina Conference in 1902.  While still a mission with eight members the minister on record was the Rev. C. M. Lance.  Rev. Lance was succeeded by the Rev. E. M. Hoyle, the first minister appointed for four years.  Rev. Hoyle’s dynamic leadership spurred rapid growth from a membership of eight to eighty-one.  The small church building also doubled in size.  A roll of 100 was reached in 1909.